My new friend – Weber Rapidfire chimney starter

So, I’d already bought a chimney starter in an Auchan, but I’d left that at my mother-in-law’s, so I had to buy a new one. And this time I thought I would buy a good one instead of a no-name product. I had quite a lot of problems with lighting up briquettes and/or charcoal, but it seems like I finally found a tool to help this part of the game.

chimney and box
The Weber Rapidfire

So, if there’s something that lights the down part of the chimney up, this Weber thing is very good.

light under chimney
Starting the chimney with the provided starter

But before all that, let’s see my problems I’ve faced and face now with the whole fire process:

– How to have burning briquette or charcoal? (Well, this is kind of solved with this Weber chimney.)

– What to use? Briquettes of charcoal?

– What to use to light up the chimney?

So, this post is about the first question. Continue reading

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Good bye party with English breakfast

A friend of mine quitted his job here at the office, and as we are quite a close bunch of colleagues (actually, more than colleagues only…), we wanted to mark his last day at the office.

The first idea was to have a burger for lunch somewhere close to the office, but we let that go because of a lack of time. Then it was a breakfast in a nearby restaurant, Mezzo Music Restaurant – but then we figured that if it is a breakfast, than we should have an English one, as he had been quite fond of it when we’d been in London a couple of years ago.

So, another friend of us had gone to a shop called Culinaris and bought the ingredients for the day.

Now, have you ever cooked in an office kitchen? Not that well-equipped, I have to tell you, really. Well, at least in our case.

Anyway, the task was given, so we collected two other toaster-ovens from different kitchens on the 5th floor, and we had a microwave oven, too. We used two toasters for the sausages, the third one for the mushroom and the tomatoes, the microwave for the sliced ham, and in about one and a half hour breakfast was ready.

 

kitchen in office
That’s what I’m talking about – the kitchen

The sausages were put into a tinfoil plate and into the toaster-oven, just like the mushroom and the tomatoes. It took three rounds to cook all the stuff bought for the occasion.

Well, prior to that, success wasn’t really guaranteed – but it was a really nice one, after all. I don’t think everyone on the floor was definitely impressed with the idea, but they were probably only envy of the food we made. The smell was delicious, and I was satisfied, really,  no questions about that, it was worth the hustle.

english breakfast
The result – not that bad, is it?

And, the ham prepared in the microwave oven was surprisingly good! Paper towel on a plate, ham, another paper towel, three minutes or so, and it’s good. Nice and easy, if you don’t have time or the tools.

The same method with the fried eggs – put some olive oil on a plate, brake three or four eggs on it, depending on the size of the plate, put it into the microwave for three or four minutes – and there you go! I don’t say that it will be worth a Michelin star but there will be no complaints.

So, that was it – and that’s the way you do the job if you are in the office!

First meeting with Wilkinson’s sausage

And the second meeting with the stuff of primecuts.hu and Robert, its owner, but we’ll get back to it later.

So this time I’d decided to order sausages, the ones called Wilkinson’s Irish sausage. Those are made fresh on every Thursday so we had them delivered on a Friday – 1 kg, 9 pieces of spicy Irish meat.

I tried three different ways of cooking them.

The Hungarian way

Sausages and blood pudding is fried in a skillet after pig slaughtering, with a bit of oil or butter and water in it. I used a little bit of butter and nothing else in the oven, on 180 °C. I didn’t make a photo, but it was nicely fried and remained juicy inside with a bit crunchy on the outside.

Fried in a non-stick pan without butter

Sausage and scrambled eggs
Sausage and scrambled eggs

Continue reading